Investigations

CVS and Amniocentesis
 
Depending on your scan results and perceived risk factors, you may be advised to have a further examination using Chorionic Villus Sampling (CVS) or Amniocentesis.
 
These tests are ‘invasive procedures’. They are valuable as they can be used to diagnose certain chromosomal and genetic abnormalities, but they do carry a risk of causing miscarriage. The risk is 0.5%. This means that 1 in every 200 women who have these tests will have a miscarriage as a result of having the test. (This figure is personalised and based on audit figures from the Homerton Hospital Department of Fetal Medicine.) 
 
Yinka will talk through the procedures in detail with you. If you would like additional support, Yinka recommends counsellors at myhealth.uk.com who have many years working with women and couples who have been advised to have CVS and amniocentesis; including follow up support once the results are received.
 
Chorionic Villus Sampling (CVS) (11-15 weeks)

Chorionic Villus Sampling is used to diagnose chromosomal abnormalities including Down’s syndrome or genetic syndromes such as Sickle Cell anaemia and Cystic Fibrosis. It may be chosen when a person's individual and family factors suggest their baby is at significant risk of an abnormality. It is performed by Yinka under close ultrasound guidance between 11 and 15 weeks of pregnancy.
Under local anaesthetic, a fine needle is passed through the abdominal wall and into the womb so that a sample of placental tissue can be obtained.
 
The tissue is sent to the laboratory for chromosome analysis and the rapid result of CVS is available within 48 working hours. As the procedure involves putting a needle into the womb, it carries a small risk (around 0.5 %) of miscarriage.
 
Amniocentesis

Amniocentesis is used to diagnose chromosomal abnormalities like Down’s syndrome. It is an invasive procedure and will be performed by Yinka under ultrasound guidance. It can be carried out from 15 weeks of pregnancy.

A fine needle is passed through the abdominal and into the womb so that a small sample of fluid from around the baby can be obtained. The fluid is sent to the laboratory for chromosome analysis and the rapid result is available within 48 working hours. As the procedure involves putting a needle into the womb, it carries a small risk (around 0.5%) of miscarriage.
 
 
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